English Haiku #16

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Nightly dreams take sway
Holding darkness tight from light
‘Til dawn breaks the dream

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© Copyright 2016 Robin McShane

P. S. Many thanks to all of you who have recently become new followers. Touches me deeply that you enjoy the poetry I present here. I am presently having internet connection issues but I will visit your blogs and touch in personally as soon as I can.

Wishing everyone a great weekend (and hoping this actually posts! 🙇)
Rob

The Sky Curdles

For NaPoWriMo/GloPoWriMo 2016 – Day 30 (to prompt) – THE FINAL DAY! 🙂

The Prompt: “…today I’d like you to try your hand at a translation of your own. If you know a foreign language, you could take a crack at translating a poem by a poet writing in that language.”

My chosen language is Afrikaans and the poem ‘Die lug skif oop’ by George Louw. I have included the original and a literal translation below.

My Poetic interpretation:

The sky curdles into speckled clouds
the kiewet laid his egg large
I roll him round and round with my eyes
until he comes to rest in my brain.

Mum has just
sent me out with the chicken feed
and with a detour through the oats
I think the speckles onto paper.

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The Original:

Die lig skif oop

Die lug skif oop in spikkelwolke
die kiewet het sy eier groot gelé;
ek rol hom met my oë om en om
totdat hy in my brein bly lé.

My mama het my netnou
met die kiepkos uitgestuur,
en met ‘n ompad deur die hawer
dink ek die spikkels op papier

George Louw

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Literal Translation:

The air curdles open

The air curdles open in speckled clouds
the Kiewet has laid his egg large
I roll him with my eyes round and round
until he remains lying in my brain.

My mummy has just
sent me outside with the chicken feed
and with a detour through the oats
I think the speckles onto paper

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So, there it is. The last day of NaPoWriMo and GloPoWriMo for 2016!

30 poems in 30 days – YAY!

Thanks to Maureen for all the prompts and to all participants for taking part and helping to build our poetry world! 🙂

An even bigger thanks to YOU for taking this ride with me. It’s been a great trip and your support along the way means the world!

See you again soon…

English Haiku – #15

NaPoWriMo/GloPoWriMo2016 – Day 29 (not to prompt but prompted by the prompt!)

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Time took breezes down
Alleyways of past content
Smiling all the while

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© Copyright 2016 Robin McShane

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The Prompt: “Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem based on things you remember.”

Sonnet #4

For NaPoWriMo/GloPoWriMo 2016 – Day 23 (to prompt)
A little late maybe but just in time (it’s now 23h30 here in South Africa)
The prompt is a challenge to write a sonnet (see below).

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I came across you on that cold, cold night,
So graceful, bold, yet something so not right.
It seemed as if your heart was on your sleeve,
Yet reaching out, it moved, began to cleave.
Enigma fast and strong yet oh so bright,
You carry in your soul a certain light,
Attracted, like a moth unto a flame,
I walked in close as you called out my name,
Then fell into your trap, the spiders web,
And felt the power within me start to ebb.
I really was a sight then to behold,
I fumbled for myself and tried to hold,
And as I stepped so close within your grasp
The sight I thought your heart was but a clasp.

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© Copyright Robin McShane

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The Prompt: “Today, I challenge you to write a sonnet. Traditionally, sonnets are 14-line poems, with ten syllables per line, written in iambs (i.e., with a meter in which an unstressed syllable is followed by one stressed syllable, and so on). There are several traditional rhyme schemes, including the Petrarchan, Spenserian, and Shakespearean sonnets. But beyond the strictures of form, sonnets usually pose a question of a sort, explore the ideas raised by the question, and then come to a conclusion. In a way, they are essays written in verse! This means you can write a “sonnet” that doesn’t have meet all of the traditional formal elements, but still functions as a mini-essay of a sort. The main point is to keep your poem tight, not rangy, and to use the shorter confines of the form to fuel the poem’s energy. As Wordsworth put it, in a very formal sonnet indeed, “Nuns fret not at their convent’s narrow room.” Happy writing!”

English Haiku – #14

For NaPoWriMo/GloPoWriMo 2016 – Day 22 (to prompt – see below)

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planted in raw sun
through ravages of turns
now resplendent power

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© Copyright 2016 Robin McShane

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The Prompt: “to write a poem in honor of Earth Day. This could be about your own backyard, a national park, or anything from a maple tree to a humpback whale. Happy writing!”

How To…’Be There’

For NaPoWriMo/GloPoWriMo 2016 – Day 19 (to prompt)

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Stand and breathe in,
The deep breath that fills the lungs
And satisfies your soul.

Sit and breathe out,
Fast and hard until there is no more
And your heart burns.

See everything around you,
Absorb the scene, drink each detail
Until your being is fit to burst.

Listen hard,
Caress the wind with your mind,
Remove the whistling moans.

Touch the air,
Taste the subtle burning spice
And feel the slow cooking cornucopia.

Release the pent-up store,
Let the panacea loose
And thrive in the moment.

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© Copyright 2016 Robin McShane

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The Prompt: “Many years ago, “didactic” poetry was very common – in other words, poetry that explicitly sought to instruct the reader in some kind of skill or knowledge, whether moral, philosophical, or practical. Today, I’d like to challenge you to write the latter kind of “how to” poem – a didactic poem that focuses on a practical skill. Hopefully, you’ll be able to weave the concrete details of the action into a compelling verse. Also, your “practical” skill could be somewhat mythological, imaginary, or funny, like “How to Capture a Mermaid” or “How to Get Your Teenager to Take Out the Garbage When He Is Supposed To.” Happy writing!

English Tanka – #8

For NaPoWriMo/GloPoWriMo 2016 – Day 15 (to prompt – see below))

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Two eyes one picture
‘Til double vision descends
Two eyes, two pictures

Takes the sense from direction
From following one pathway

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© Copyright 2016 Robin McShane

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The prompt: “Because today marks the halfway point in our 30-day sprint, today I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that incorporates the idea of doubles.”